Vegetable Gardening 2010 Page One 

When the going gets tough, the tough gets growing.

Our Garden Starts With A Visit To Roger's Gardens!

Step #1 - Go To Roger's Gardens

We have been going to Roger's forever... Best nursery in the area!  See some of our other visits around Christmas Time!

Rogers sign

Spring at Rogers
They are NOT kidding!

Spring at Rogers
Nope! They are NOT red and round!

An Example.... The Cherokee Purple!

Cherokee Purple

Did you know? - This cultivar originated with Craig LeHoullier, who claimed it was a century-old cultivar originating with the Cherokee people. In 1990, while living in West Chester, Pennsylvania, Craig received unsolicited in the mail, from John Green of Sevierville, Tennessee, a brief note and a small packet of seeds.

The note indicated that John wanted to share this unnamed tomato with Craig, and that it was a purple tomato that the Cherokee Indians gave to his neighbors 100 years ago. Upon growing the seeds and observing the fruit, Craig was surprised and delighted to find that the fruit was remarkably close to being a true purple in color (pink tomatoes were often referred to as purple in horticultural literature, so the color of the tomato was quite a surprise). The tomato was named in line with the note that accompanied the seeds, and a sample of seeds sent that winter to Jeff McCormack, founder of Southern Exposure Seed Exchange, as well as listed in the Seed Savers Exchange (SSE) Yearbook 1991 edition.

Spring at Rogers
Sue picks out the heirloom tomatoes... This is justa start!

Did you know? - An heirloom tomato (also called heritage tomato in the UK) is an open-pollinated (non-hybrid) heirloom cultivar of tomato. Heirloom tomatoes have become increasingly popular and more readily available in recent years. Heirloom tomato cultivars can be found in a wide variety of colors, shapes, flavors and sizes. Some cultivars can be prone to cracking or lack disease resistance. As with most garden plants, cultivars can be acclimated over several gardening seasons to thrive in a geographical location through careful selection and seed saving.

We Always Stroll Through The Garden's To Look at Other Delights

Spring at Rogers
A rainbow of colors

Spring at Rogers
Multicolored Calla Lilies

Did you know? - Zantedeschia is a genus of herbaceous flowering plants in the family Araceae, native to southern Africa from South Africa north to Malawi. The name of the genus was given as a tribute to Italian botanist Giovanni Zantedeschi (1773–1846) by the German botanist Kurt Sprengel (1766–1833). Common names include Arum lily for Z. aethiopica, calla, and calla lily for Z. elliottiana and Z. rehmannii although it is neither a true lily (Liliaceae), nor Arum or Calla (related genera in Araceae). It is also often erroneously spelled as "cala lily". It has often been used in many paintings, and is visible in many of Diego Rivera's works of art (see The Flower Vendor, amongst others).

Spring at Rogers
The whitest white

Spring at Rogers
The redest red

Spring at Rogers
Beautiful colors

Spring at Rogers
The Japanese Maple was magnificent

Did you know? - Acer palmatum, called Japanese Maple or Smooth Japanese Maple (Japanese: irohamomiji; いろは紅葉 or いろはもみじ?) is a species of woody plant native to Japan, Korea and China. Many different cultivars of this maple have been selected and they are commonly grown in other parts of the world too, for their attractive leaf shapes and colors. They are highly sought after and are relatively costly trees given the size.

Spring at Rogers

Spring at Rogers
Christmas time???

Spring at Rogers
Pansies

Did you know? - The pansy or pansy violets are a large group of hybrid plants cultivated as garden flowers Pansies are derived from Viola species Viola tricolor hybridized with other viola species, these hybrids are referred to as Viola × wittrockiana or less commonly Viola tricolor hortensis. The name "pansy" also appears as part of the common name for other Viola species that are wildflowers in Europe.

Roger's Veggies Are Super And A Wide Variety!

Spring at Rogers

Spring at Rogers

Magnificent Hydrangeas

Spring at Rogers

Did you know? - In most species the flowers are white, but in some species (notably H. macrophylla), can be blue, red, pink, light purple, or dark purple. In these species the exact colour often mirrors the pH of the soil; acidic soils produce blue flowers, neutral soils produce very pale cream petals, and alkaline soils results in pink or purple. This is the caused by a color change of the flower pigments in the presence of aluminium ions which can be taken up into hyperaccumulating plants.

Spring at Rogers

What Is Inside Today???

Spring at Rogers
You should have heard these little chatterboxes... Loud!

Spring at Rogers
Look for them at the top of the cage

Sue Grabbed The Camera

Spring at Rogers

Spring at Rogers

It's Always Christmas At Roger's

Spring at Rogers
Amazing decorations

Did you know? - The Shiny-Brite company produced the most popular Christmas tree ornaments in the United States throughout the 1940's and '50s.

In 1937, Max Eckhardt established "Shiny-Brite" ornaments, working with the Corning Glass Company to mass produce glass Christmas ornaments. Eckhardt had been importing hand-blown glass balls from Germany since around 1907, but had the foresight to anticipate a disruption in his supply from the upcoming war. Corning adapted their process for making light bulbs to making clear glass ornaments, which were then shipped to Eckhardt's factories to be decorated by hand. The fact that Shiny-Brite ornaments were an American-made product was stressed as a selling point during World War II.

Dating of the ornaments is often facilitated by studying the hook. The first Shiny-Brite ornaments had the traditional metal cap and loop, with the hook attached to the loop, from which the ornament was hung from the tree.

Wartime production necessitated the replacement of the metal cap with a cardboard tab, from which the owner would use yarn or string to hang the ornament. These hangers firmly place the date of manufacture of the ornament to the early 1940's.

Following the war, Shiny-Brite introduced a line of ornaments with a newly designed metal hook that provided the user with two lengths of hanger. The long hook traveled through the center of the ornament and exited the bottom, where it attached to the foot of the ornament. This provided the "short" hanger. Unlatched from the bottom, the entire length of the hook was available, allowing the ornament to dangle at a greater distance from the tree limb to which it was attached. This arrangement was designed to allow the ornament to fill sparsely limbed areas of a natural tree.

The increasing popularity of the aluminum artificial Christmas tree, first manufactured in 1958, made this device far less attractive to the consumer, as an artificial tree had no gaps to be filled. The added expense of the lengthy hanging wire coupled with the diminishing need caused this feature to be discontinued in 1960.

The demand for glass ornaments waned as plastic ornaments became more popular, ultimately bringing the Shiny-Brite company to close its doors in 1962.

During its peak, Shiny-Brite had four factories in New Jersey, located in the cities of Hoboken, Irvington, North Bergen, and West New York. The company's content office and showroom were located at 45 East 17th Street in New York City, NY.

Shiny-Brite's most popular ornaments have been reissued by Christopher Radko since 2001.

Our tree
Our tree thanks to Roger's...

Spring at Rogers
Wow!

Spring at Rogers
I remember my mother making these in the mid 1960's...

Spring at Rogers
We buy the miniture versions of these every year from Rogers and have quite a collection

When We Got Home The Guard Dogs Were Waiting

Spring at Rogers
Sarge and Flower trying to wake up