The Huntington Library

Visiting The Huntington Library Is Always a Treat

Birthday Month Visit 7/14/2014 With Carri And Greg (Page One)

Page 1 - Pre-Lunch Stroll   | Page 2 - Lunch And The Japanese/Chinese Gardens

It's Sue's birthday month and time to visit the gardens.... Actually any excuse will do!

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
The magnolia's were in bloom at the entrance

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
We headed to the cactus/dessert garden first

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Beauty and the beast.... Red flowers and dangerous limbs

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
His tummy is stuffed with water

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
The colors indicate the new growth

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
The 27 dwarfs stand and watch

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
The trunk on this tree will not be limbed

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Growing right out of the rock

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Lost in space

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
How did these two plants become the way they are??? Just amazing!

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
The gardeners keep the grounds looking nice

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
The blossoms must have a function that deals with the color

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Greg goes off-roading to visit the gardener

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Check the indentations in the leaves where the one next to it was located

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
We are doing lily ponds next

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
The Morning Glory met us with a smile

Did You Know? - Most morning glory flowers unravel into full bloom in the early morning. The flowers usually start to fade a few hours before the "petals" start showing visible curling. They prefer full solar exposure throughout the day.

Morning glory was first known in China for its medicinal uses, due to the laxative properties of its seeds.

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
We got a tiny rain shower but didn't need to run indoors

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
The lily pads were beautiful. Water lilies are rooted in soil in bodies
of water, with leaves and flowers floating on the surface.

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Agapanthus's and other flowers make for a veritable rainbow of colors

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
He stuck his head way up high

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Why blue and purple?

Did You Know? - Flavonoids are the yellow plant pigments seen most notably in lemons, oranges, and grapefruit. The name stems from the Latin word "flavus," which means yellow. Flavonoids in flowers and fruit provide visual cues for animal pollinators and seed dispersers to locate their targets.

Flavonoids are located in the cytoplasm and plastids. Many of the foods that we eat, including dark chocolate, strawberries, blueberries, cinnamon, pecans, walnuts, grapes, and cabbage, contain flavonoids.

These chemicals lower cholesterol levels, and many have antioxidant properties. Anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins, and the reddish-brown pigment theaflavin found in tea, act to create color, while most other flavonoids are visible only under UV light.

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Mr. Turtle is watching us carefully... Only his eyes show

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Greg looks for other wildlife

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
The ducks and fish seem to be happy together

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Did anyone say red???

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
We are walking up the canyon towards to rose garden

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
The rain shower watered the leaves and left them clean and full of water

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Wild orchid out in the open

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Leave the leaves there... Just beautiful

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
The house finally appears

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
We took the arbor path to the rose garden

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Look carefully.... What do you see?

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
He was real! He was fearless

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Egan got his own "Official" garden sign for his cement trees

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Iron pipe arbors in the rose garden

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Bright colors everywhere

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
The weather was 76 degrees and about 70 percent humidity...

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
The handle plant..... No! A hose bib is hidden in the box plant

Did You Know? - Owing to its fine grain it is a good wood for fine wood carving, although this is limited by the small sizes available. It is also resistant to splitting and chipping, and thus useful for decorative or storage boxes. Formerly, it was used for wooden combs. As a timber or wood for carving it is "boxwood" in all varieties of English.

Owing to the relatively high density of the wood (it is one of the few woods that are denser than water), boxwood is often used for chess pieces, unstained boxwood for the white pieces and stained ('ebonized') boxwood for the black pieces, in lieu of ebony.

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Pinks and whites coexisting together in peace

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Japanese Beetles enjoying lunch

Did You Know? - The beetle species Populi japonica is commonly known as the Japanese beetle. It is about 15 millimetres (0.6 in) long and 10 millimetres (0.4 in) wide, with iridescent copper-colored elytra and green thorax and head. It is not very destructive in Japan, where it is controlled by natural predators, but in North America it is a serious pest of about 200 species of plants, including rose bushes, grapes, hops, canna, crape myrtles, birch trees, linden trees and others.

It is a clumsy flier, dropping several centimeters when it hits a wall. Japanese beetle traps therefore consist of a pair of crossed walls with a bag or plastic container underneath, and are baited with floral scent, pheromone, or both.

However, studies conducted at the University of Kentucky and Eastern Illinois University suggest beetles attracted to traps frequently do not end up in the traps, but alight on plants in the vicinity, thus causing more damage along the flight path of the beetles and near the trap than may have occurred if the trap were not present.

These insects damage plants by skeletonizing the foliage, that is, consuming only the leaf material between the veins, and may also feed on fruit on the plants if present.

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Munch munch munch

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Restoration of the statue was successful

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Beautiful

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
To the right is the "Kitchen Garden"

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014

Did You Know? - The traditional kitchen garden, also known as a potager (in French, jardin potager) or in Scotland a kailyaird, is a space separate from the rest of the residential garden – the ornamental plants and lawn areas. Most vegetable gardens are still miniature versions of old family farm plots, but the kitchen garden is different not only in its history, but also its design.

The kitchen garden may serve as the central feature of an ornamental, all-season landscape, or it may be little more than a humble vegetable plot. It is a source of herbs, vegetables and fruits, but it is often also a structured garden space with a design based on repetitive geometric patterns.

The kitchen garden has year-round visual appeal and can incorporate permanent perennials or woody shrub plantings around (or among) the annuals.

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Most everything is edible or used in cooking

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Peppers? Jalapenos galore

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Pabalanos... Yummy

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Now we are talking hot

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Greg does a careful examination of the garden

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Reds and greens made it look like Christmas

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Basil with berries???

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
The miniature orange tree was loaded

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Sue loved seeing the peppers

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Their grapes also had mildew damage

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
The trees were in full blossom

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
The sunflowers were quite tall... Probably 8-9 feet

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Simply amazing....

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
It was loud you could hear it before you saw it

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
The planters were in great shape

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
Pomegranates were developing

Did You Know? - The pomegranate /ˈpɒmɨɡrænɨt/, botanical name Punica granatum, is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree growing between 5–8 meters (16–26 ft) tall. In the Northern Hemisphere, the fruit is typically in season from September to February, and in the Southern Hemisphere from March to May. Pomegranates are used in cooking, baking, juices, smoothies and alcoholic beverages, such as martinis and wine.

The pomegranate is considered to have originated in the region of Iran to northern India and has been cultivated since ancient times.

It is mentioned in many ancient texts, notably in Babylonian texts and the Book of Exodus.

It was introduced into Latin America and California by Spanish settlers in 1769.

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014
OK.... Time to eat

Birthday month visit to the Huntington July 2014

Page 1 - Pre-Lunch Stroll   | Page 2 - Lunch And The Japanese/Chinese Gardens