So...There Is This Old Ship!

Nothing Else Counts In This World!   

A Long Lunch Comes With Stories

It's the second day of the new year and what better to do than spend several hours in an English pub with our frineds the Finch's. Great thruths are shared and we save the world at least 3 times an hour for hours on end! What might happen today? Who knows?

DIning at the Old Ship with the Finch's
We enter through the servants entrance...OK, the back door!

DIning at the Old Ship with the Finch's
The loo's are on the right and the lights are still up and flashing!

Did You Know? - Curry (plural curries) is a variety of dishes originating in the Indian subcontinent that use a complex combination of spices or herbs, usually including ground turmeric, cumin, coriander, ginger, and fresh or dried chilies. Curry is generally prepared in a sauce. Curry dishes prepared in the southern states of India, where the word also originated, may be spiced with leaves from the curry tree.

DIning at the Old Ship with the Finch's
Dr. Finch is in the office and devouring Indian curry

DIning at the Old Ship with the Finch's
Jan is happy...had her spot of tea! Ready for stories!

DIning at the Old Ship with the Finch's
Sue loves those Indian Samosas and a veggie burger

Did You Know? - A samosa (/s??mo?s?/) is a fried or baked dish with a savoury filling, such as spiced potatoes, onions, peas, or lentils. It may take different forms, including triangular, cone, or half-moon shapes, depending on the region. The Indian style, often accompanied by a chutney, is probably the most widely-known of a broad family of recipes from Africa to China, which have origins in medieval times or earlier.

Samosas are a popular entr?e, appetizer, or snack in the local cuisines of the Indian subcontinent, Western Asia, Southeast Asia, the Mediterranean, the Horn of Africa, North Africa, and Southern Africa.

DIning at the Old Ship with the Finch's
The currie was describes as "bloody hot"
It was pretty good!

Did You Know? - Bloody, as an adverb, is a commonly used expletive attributive (intensifier) in British English, Australian English, and a number of other Commonwealth nations. It has been used as an intensive since at least the 1670s.

Considered "respectable" until about 1750, it was heavily tabooed during c. 1750?1920, considered equivalent to heavily obscene or profane speech.

Public use continued to be seen as controversial until the 1960s, but since the later 20th century, the word has become a comparatively mild expletive or intensifier.

In American English, the word is uncommon and is seen by American audiences as a stereotypical marker of British English, without any significant obscene or profane connotation.

DIning at the Old Ship with the Finch's
Over the teeth and through the gums
Lookout tonsils, here it comes

DIning at the Old Ship with the Finch's
Beware of tales of years gone bye

DIning at the Old Ship with the Finch's

Translation: Brian owned a car with a bad water leak. He found a "magical solution" that you pour into the radiator and it was supposed to seal up the crack...stop the leak! Did it work? Click the arrow below to find out!



Brian's Miracle Fix It Liquid...

DIning at the Old Ship with the Finch's
Oh.... That's Brian on the left!

DIning at the Old Ship with the Finch's
Captains Courageous!

DIning at the Old Ship with the Finch's
Jan, Sue, and Paul sneaked out....
Brian kept telling his new friends more stories


Good by Old Ship!
We will pick up Brian later this evening