The Starlighters Dance Club Dance Event

To watch us dance is to hear our hearts speak.  ~Hopi Indian Saying

Dancing Continues With A Line Dance! (Page Two)

Page One - The Party Begins | Page Two - Line Dancers
Page Three (Dinner Pictures) | Page Four (Comics)

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Seems the girls outnumber the boys

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
The hands are supposed to be 18 inches apart

Did you know? - The earliest folk dances in many cultures were line dances, originating before social proprieties allowed men and women to dance together in couple dances. In early forms men and women often danced in separate lines, but the same dances are often done today in mixed lines.

The Balkan countries, among others, have a rich tradition of line dance surviving to the present. Folk line dances have many forms: pairs of lines in which the dancers face each other, or a line formed into a circle, or the line follows a leader around the dance floor. The dancers may hold hands with their neighbors, or use an arm-on-shoulder hold, or hold their neighbor's belts.

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Did you know? - Billy Ray Cyrus' 1992 hit Achy Breaky Heart, helped catapult western line dancing into the mainstream public consciousness.

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Go Jan's

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Yes.... Finger snapping is allowed under Starlighter's rules

Did you know? - These dances are often made up from the applejack, botafogo, butterfly, coaster step, heel grind, hitch, jazz box, kick ball change, kick ball step, lunge, mambo step, military turn, Monterey turn, paddle, pivot turn, rock step, sailor step, scissor step, scuff, spiral turn, stamp, stomp, sugarfoot, swivet and vaudeville.

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Oh oh!  The cameraman is in trouble again

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Grass skirts optional even with a Hawaiian tiara

Did you know? - Traditionally, the word "tiara" refers to a high crown, often with the shape of a cylinder narrowed at its top, made of fabric or leather, and richly ornamented. It was used by the kings and emperors of some ancient peoples in Mesopotamia. The Assyrians used to include a pair of bull horns as a decoration and symbol of authority and a circle of short feathers surrounding the tiara's top. The Persian tiara was more similar to a truncated cone, without the horns and feathers but more jewels, and a conic-shaped tip at its top.

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Our guests like line dancing

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Bob takes a few minutes out

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Ralph and Elsa Moore

We Sometimes Learn New Steps (The Acky Breaky Back)

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Adrienne... That's NOT how we do "Achy Breaky Back!"

Did you know? - "Achy Breaky Heart" is a hit country music song written by Don Von Tress. Originally titled "Don't Tell My Heart", its name was later changed to "Achy Breaky Heart" and was recorded by Billy Ray Cyrus on his 1992 CD Some Gave All. As Cyrus' debut single and signature song, it made him famous and has been his most successful song. The song became a crossover hit on pop and country radio, peaking at #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 and topping the Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart.

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
"This feels better!!"

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Marilyn says "Stop with the pictures and dance with me!!!"

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Marilyn danced s fast Paul's shoes came off!

Time For A Floor Show By The Jon Destry Player(s)

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Jon does three characters

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
He looks so.... Ah?

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
The proposal

Did you know? - "Achy Breaky Heart" is a hit country music song written by Don Von Tress. Originally titled "Don't Tell My Heart", its name was later changed to "Achy Breaky Heart" and was recorded by Billy Ray Cyrus on his 1992 CD Some Gave All. As Cyrus' debut single and signature song, it made him famous and has been his most successful song. The song became a crossover hit on pop and country radio, peaking at #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 and topping the Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart.

Time To Return To Our Irish Roots Thanks To Ron O'May

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Ron May volunteered to sing "Danny Boy"

Did you know? - The lyrics to "Danny Boy" were written by the English lawyer and lyricist Frederick Weatherly in 1910. Although the lyrics were originally written for a different tune, Weatherly modified them to fit "Londonderry Air" in 1913 when his sister-in-law in America sent him a copy. Ernestine Schumann-Heink made the first recording in 1915. Weatherly gave the song to the vocalist Elsie Griffin, who in turn made it one of the most popular songs in the new century. In 1928, Weatherly suggested that the second verse would provide a fitting requiem for the actress Ellen Terry.

"Danny Boy" was originally said to be intended as a message from a woman to a man, and Weatherly provided the alternative "Eily dear" for male singers in his 1918 authorized lyrics. However, the song is actually sung by men as much as, or possibly more than, women. The song has been interpreted by some listeners as a message from a parent to a son going off to war or leaving as part of the Irish diaspora.

The song is widely considered an Irish anthem, although Weatherly was an Englishman. Nonetheless, "Danny Boy" is considered by many Irish Americans and Irish Canadians to be their unofficial signature song

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Oh Danny boy, the pipes, the pipes are calling
From glen to glen, and down the mountain side
The summer's gone, and all the roses falling
'Tis you, 'tis you must go and I must bide.
But come ye back when summer's in the meadow
Or when the valley's hushed and white with snow
'Tis I'll be here in sunshine or in shadow
Oh Danny boy, oh Danny boy, I love you so.

But when ye come, and all the flowers are dying
If I am dead, as dead I well may be
You'll come and find the place where I am lying
And kneel and say an "Ave" there for me.
And I shall hear, tho' soft you tread above me
And all my grave will warmer, sweeter be
For ye shall bend and tell me that you love me
And I shall sleep in peace until you come to me.

Back To Dancing

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Adrienne shows Bob a new step

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Nothing like a swing dance

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
They are at it again!

Y.M.C.A. Time

Did you know? - "Y.M.C.A." is a 1978 song by the Village People which became a hit in January 1979. The song reached #2 on the U.S. charts in early 1979 and reached No.1 in the UK around the same time, becoming the group's biggest hit ever. Taking the song at face value, its lyrics extol the virtues of the Young Men's Christian Association.

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010 Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Paula leads the parade

Did you know? - "YMCA" is also the name of a group dance with cheerleader Y-M-C-A choreography invented to fit the song. One of the phases involves moving arms to form the letters Y-M-C-A as they are sung in the chorus:

  • Y - Arms outstretched and raised
  • M - Made by bending the elbows from the 'Y' pose so the fingertips meet over the chest
  • C - Arms extended to the left
  • A - Hands held together above head

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Kinda looks like a lazy "U"

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Spelling is NOT their strong suit

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Nope Don, that is definitely an "L"

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Our guests do "Y's" very well

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YMCA can be done while sitting down!

Time For The Conga!

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The little engine that could

Little engine

Did you know? - The Little Engine that Could, also known as The Pony Engine, is a moralistic children's story that appeared in the United States of America. The book is used to teach children the value of optimism and hard work. Some critics would contend that the book is a metaphor for the American dream.

In the tale, a long train must be pulled over a high mountain. Various larger engines, treated anthropomorphically, are asked to pull the train; for various reasons they refuse. The request is sent to a small engine, who agrees to try. The engine succeeds in pulling the train over the mountain while repeating its motto: "I-think-I-can".

The tale with its easy-to-grasp moral has become a classic children's story and was adapted in 1991 as a 30-minute animated film produced in Wales and co-financed in Wales and the United States. The film named the famous little engine 'Tillie' and expanded the narrative into a larger story of self-discovery.

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Did you know? - The conga line is a Latin American carnival march that was first developed in Cuba and became popular in the United States in the 1930s and 1950s. The dancers form a long, processing line. It has three shuffle steps on the beat, followed by a kick that is slightly ahead of the fourth beat.

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Leon is the caboose on this train

Caboose

Did you know? - A caboose (North American railway terminology) or brake van or guard's van (British terminology) is a manned rail transport vehicle coupled at the end of a freight train. Although cabooses were once used on nearly every freight train, their use has declined and they are seldom seen on trains, except on locals and smaller railroads.

The caboose provided the train crew with a shelter at the rear of the train. The crew could exit the train for switching or to protect the rear of the train when stopped. They also inspected the train for problems such as shifting loads, broken or dragging equipment, and hot boxes. The conductor kept records and handled business from a table or desk in the caboose. For longer trips the caboose provided minimal living quarters, and was frequently personalized and decorated with pictures and posters.

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
Watch out! She's heading out the door!

Conga Drum

Did you know? - The conga dance style is more of a march, which is characterized by its distinctive conga drum rhythm. It differs from the rumba, which uses more hip movements and shows the sensually aggressive attitude of each dancer. Conga music is played with a staccato beat as its base, which gives rhythm to the movements of the dancers. Conga dancers lift their legs in time with the rhythm of the music, marking each beat with the strong motion of their body.

The basic steps start from left leg 1-2-3 kick then repeat, opposite. Originally a band member, wearing a drum and beating would venture onto the dance floor. He would start zigzagging around the floor with his drum and the dancer would start to follow him behind doing the dance like a slithering snake. The line grows and the drums would intensify until the drum just stopped played.

The dance has no fancy ending like other dance do. The dance has two styles which is a single line form and partners. The single line is more popular in Cuba. However the Conga Line was done much earlier and was introduced at a wedding Reception (Frieda’s) as early as 1905 by the “Gloriosky Old Maids”, specifically Prudence Adams.

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

An Irish Folk Dance Called "Hava Nagila"

Did you know? - "Hava Nagila" (Hebrew: הבה נגילה) is a Hebrew folk song, the title meaning "let us rejoice". It is a song of celebration, especially popular amongst Jewish and Romani communities, and is a staple of band performers at Jewish festivals.

The melody was taken from a Ukrainian folk song from Bukovina. The commonly used text was probably composed by Abraham Zevi (Zvi) Idelsohn in 1918 to celebrate the British victory in Palestine during World War I as well as the Balfour Declaration.

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Meanwhile in The Back Of The Room The Cowboy Cha-Cha Is Being Practiced

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010
... and then danced!

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

The Party Is Over

Starlighter's Winter Casual 2010

Page One - The Party Begins | Page Two - Line Dancers
Page Three (Dinner Pictures) | Page Four (Comics)