Dancing With Carri Fox

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One-Two-Cha-Cha-Cha

Chacha Wikipedia Originally known as the Cha-Cha-Cha. Became popular about 1954. Cha Cha is an offshoot of the Mambo. In the slow Mambo tempo, there was a distinct sound in the music that people began dancing to, calling the step the "Triple" Mambo. Eventually it evolved into a separate dance, known today as the Cha Cha.The dance consists of three quick steps (triple step or cha cha cha) and two slower steps on the one beat and two beat.

The cha-cha requires very small steps because of its rhythm. The cha-cha part of the rhythm is almost a chasse, or a series of small gliding steps that touch the floor. It is danced to 4/4 time, meaning that there are four beats to a measure. The count is slow-slow-quick-quick-slow, and dancers turn while executing the steps. Spins and dips can be added, as well as an huge variety of fancy footwork. Locksteps, turns and sideways motions are also included, with breaks, or places where dancing stops entirely for a moment. Weight must be shifted carefully to make motions appear seamless.

ChaChaThe cha-cha requires a lot of hip motion, which is how dancers make it expressive. The pelvis is held in one position and left free for this motion. Although the cha-cha uses smaller steps, dancers in competition often elongate their movement slightly to travel across the floor. Alternating between long and short steps remains the key to winning a cha-cha competition.

The cha-cha was created in Cuba by a Cuban violinist called Enrique Jorrin in 1954 When dancing the cha-cha very small steps are needed because of its rhythm. The cha-cha part of the rhythm is a series of small gliding steps that barely touch the floor. A huge variety of fancy footwork can be added to the dance. Weight has to be moved carefully to make motions look gliding.

The cha-cha includes a lot of hip motion. The pelvis is held in one position and left free for this motion. Even though the cha-cha uses smaller steps, dancers in competitions usually make their movement slightly longer to travel across the floor.

The Cha-cha became hugely popular in the United States as did the mambo in the 1950s. Dancers began inventing new steps and turns to win competitions.