Old Glory D-Day When We Saved The World Again

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D-Day When America Saved The World

Saturday, June 6th, marks the 65th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy. On D-Day, June 6, 1944, Allied troops departed England on planes and ships, made the trip across the English Channel and attacked the beaches of Normandy in an attempt to break through Hitler’s “Atlantic Wall” and break his grip on Europe. Some 215,000 Allied soldiers, and roughly as many Germans, were killed or wounded during D-Day and the ensuing nearly three months it took to secure the Allied capture of Normandy. Commemoration events, from re-enactments to school concerts, were being held in seaside towns and along the five landing beaches that stretch across 50 miles (80 kilometers) of Normandy coastline. The big event is Saturday, when Obama, French President Nicolas Sarkozy, the Canadian and British prime ministers and Prince Charles gather for a ceremony amid the rows of white crosses and Stars of David at the American cemetery, which is U.S. territory. (AP)

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American Soldiers equiped with full pack and extra allotments of ammunition, march down ian english street
to their invasion craft for embarkation on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)

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Supreme Commander Dwight Eisenhower gives the order of the day “Full victory – Nothing else” to
paratroopers of the 101st Airborne Division at the Royal Air Force base in Greenham Common,
England, three hours before the men board their planes to participate in the first assault wave of the
invasion of the continent of Europe, June 5, 1944. (AP Photo)

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Lieutenant Harrie W. James, USNR, of New York, N.Y., briefs officers and men who participated in
landing operations during the invasion of Southern France June 5, 1944 on the day before D-Day. (AP Photo)

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Sight of a low-flying Allied plane sends Nazi soldiers rushing for shelter on a beach in France,
before D-Day June 1944. Their fears were premature; the fliers were taking photos of German coastal
barriers in preparation for the invasion, which took place June 6. (AP Photo)

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Airborne troops prepare for the descent on Europe of D-Day invasion June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)  

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American paratroopers, heavily armed, sit inside a military plane as they soar over the English
Channel en route to the Normandy French coast for the Allied D-Day invasion of the German
stronghold during World War II, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)  

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U.S. paratroopers fix their static lines before a jump before dawn over Normandy on D-Day June 6, 1944,
in France. The decision to launch the airborne attack in darkness instead of waiting for first light was
probably one of the few Allied missteps on June 6, and there was much to criticize both in the training
and equipment given to paratroopers and glider-borne troops of the 82nd and 101st airborne divisions.
Improvements were called for after the invasion; the hard-won knowledge would be used to advantage
later. (AP Photo/Army Signal Corps)

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U.S. serviceman attend a Protestant service aboard a landing craft before the D-Day invasion on the
coast of France, June 5, 1944. (AP Photo/Pete Carroll)  

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U.S. reinforcements wade through the surf from a landing craft in the days following D-Day and the
Allied invasion of Nazi-occupied France at Normandy in June 1944 during World War II. (AP Photo/Bert Brandt)

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After landing at the shore, these British troops wait for the signal to move forward, during the initial
Allied landing operations in Normandy, France, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)

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Barrage balloons are used for aerial protection as part of the invasion fleet, carrying men and
supplies as they move across the channel towards the French invasion coast. .(AP Photo /Peter Carroll )

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This June 6, 1944 photo released by Nathan Kline, shows a B-26 Marauder flying toward France during
the D-Day invasion. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Nathan Kline)

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Wounded British troops from the South Lancashire and Middlesex regiments are being helped ashore at
Sword Beach, June 6, 1944, during the D-Day invasion of German occupied France during World War II. (AP Photo)
 

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American soldiers and supplies arrive on the shore of the French coast of German-occupied Normandy
during the Allied D-Day invasion on June 6, 1944 in World War II. (AP Photo)
 

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Carrying full equipment, American assault troops move onto a beachhead code-named Omaha Beach,
on the northern coast of France on June 6, 1944, during the Allied invasion of the Normandy coast. (AP Photo)
 

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Sitting in the cover of their foxholes, American soldiers of the Allied Expeditionary Force secure a
beachhead during initial landing operations at Normandy, France, June 6, 1944. In the background
amphibious tanks and other equipment crowd the beach, while landing craft bring more troops and
material ashore. (AP Photo/Weston Hayes)
 

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Canadian troops in landing crafts approach a stretch of coastline code-named Juno Beach, near
Bernieres-sur-mer, as the Allied Normandy invasion gets under way, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
 

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Members of an American landing unit help their exhausted comrades ashore during the Normandy
invasion, June 6, 1944. The men reached the zone code-named Utah Beach, near Sainte Mere Eglise,
on a life raft after their landing craft was hit and sunk by German coastal defenses. (AP Photo)
 

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A U.S. Coast Guard LCI, heavily listing to port, moves alongside a transport ship to evacuate
her troops, during the initial Normandy landing operations in France, on June 6, 1944. Moments
later the craft will capsize and sink. Note that helmeted infantrymen, with full packs, are all
standing to starboard side of the ship. (AP Photo)
 

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Men and assault vehicles storm the Normandy Beach of France, as allied landing craft arrive at their
destination on D-Day, June 6, 1944. Note men coming ashore in surf and vehicles starting inland. (AP Photo)
 

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Out of the open bow doors of a Landing Craft, American troops and jeeps go ashore on the beach of
the Normandy coast of France, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
 

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Lt. William V. Patten, centre of group, wearing overseas cap, briefs his crew at a port in England before the
invasion of France began June 6, 1944. Patten and his ship are veterans of Tunisia, Salerno, Anzio and Licata. (AP Photo)
 

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Under the cover of naval shell fire, American infantrymen wade ashore from their landing craft during
the initial Normandy landing operations in France, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo/Peter Carroll)
 

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A U.S. Coast Guard landing barge, tightly packed with helmeted soldiers, approaches the shore at
Normandy, France, during initial Allied landing operations, June 6, 1944. These barges ride back and
forth across the English Channel, bringing wave after wave of reinforcement troops to
the Allied beachheads. (AP Photo)
 

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Under heavy German machine gun fire, American infantrymen wade ashore off the ramp of a Coast Guard
landing craft on June 8, 1944, during the invasion of the French coast of Normandy in World War II. (AP Photo)
 

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US assault troops approach Utah Beach in a barge, 06 June 1944 as Allied forces storm the Normand beaches
on D-Day. D-Day, is still one of the world’s most gut-wrenching and consequential battles, as the Allied landing
in Normandy led to the liberation of France which marked the turning point in the Western theater of
World War II. AFP PHOTO
 

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A tribute to an unknown American soldier, who lost his life fighting in the landing operations of the
Allied Forces, marks the sand of Normandy’s shore, in June 1944. (AP Photo)
 

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U.S. Army medical personnel administer a plasma transfusion to a wounded comrade, who survived
when his landing craft went down off the coast of Normandy, France, in the early days of the Allied
landing operations in June 1944. (AP Photo)

 

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German prisoners of war are led away by Allied forces from Utah Beach, on June 6, 1944, during
landing operations at the Normandy coast, France. (AP Photo)
 

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U.S doughboys are brought ashore on the Northern Coast of France following the D-Day invasion of
Normandy in World War II on June 13, 1944. The exhausted soldiers on the rubber life raft are
being pulled by a group of comrades. (AP Photo/U.S. Army Signal Corps)
 

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Allied forces camp out in fox holes, caves and tents on this hillside overlooking the beach at Normandy,
France, during the D-Day invasion in World War II. (AP Photo/Bede Irvin)
 

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One year after the D-Day landings in Normandy, a lone U.S. soldier guards a knocked out German
gun position on “Utah” Beach, France, May 28, 1945. (AP Photo/Peter J. Carroll)
 

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One year after the D-Day landings in Normandy, German prisoners landscape the area around a former
German pill box at Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer, France, near “Omaha” Beach, May 28, 1945. The pill box,
with a knocked out gun still visible, will be made into a monument dedicated to U.S.
assault forces. (AP Photo/Peter J. Carroll)
 

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One year after the D-Day landings in Normandy, German prisoners landscape the first U.S. cemetery
at Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer, France, near “Omaha” Beach, May 28, 1945. (AP Photo/Peter J. Carroll)
 

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Gen. Dwight Eisenhower stands on the cliff overlooking Omaha Beach on the Normandy coast in
France as he makes an anniversary visit to the scene of the 1945 D-Day landing of the
Allied troops, June 9, 1951. (AP Photo)
 

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Pointe du Hoc. Omaha Beach, pocked by D-Day bombardment. On June 6th. 1944, five Normandy
beaches were stormed by British, Canadian and American troops to free Europe from the German
occupation. Ever since, each year on June 6th, Normandy coast lures veterans
and pilgrims. (Ph: Alexandra BOULAT)
 

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Pebbles with poppies painted on are seen on the beach of Saint-Aubin-sur-Mer on June 5, 2009
during a ceremony in memory of Canadian troops which landed in 1944 at the Nan Red point
on Saint-Aubin beach. Each poppy painted by students represents a soldier killed here during
World War II. Preparations are underway for the upcoming D-Day celebrations to
mark the 65th anniversary of the June 6, 1944 allied landings in France,
then occupied by Nazi Germany. US President Barack Obama is to lead commemorations attended
by thousands of Americans on June 6 at the ceremony above Omaha Beach, where more than
9,000 US troops fought and died in June 1944. (DANIAU/AFP/Getty Images) 

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Normandy veterans Frank Allen (R), 85, and Cyril Askew, 92, both from Liverpool, England, look at the
French coastline on a cross channel ferry on June 4, 2009 from Portsmouth, England to Caen, France.
Several hundred of the remaining veterans of the Normandy campaign are travelling to France to take part
in commemorations to mark the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings in 1944. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
 

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The sun shines on headstones in the British Cemetery on June 5 2009 in Bayeux, France. Several hundred
of the remaining veterans of the Normandy campaign are travelling to France to take part in commemorations
to mark the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings in 1944. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
 

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British school children help to place 4000 Union Jack flags bearing messages on Gold Beach on June 5, 2009 in
Asnelles, France. The Royal British Legion has raised £1.8 million for veterans and tomorrow on the 65th
anniversary of the D-Day landings a further 6000 flags will be placed on Gold beach, the location where British
forces landed on 6th June 1944. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
 

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A US jeep drives by Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer beach, Normandy, western France on June 4, 2009 during
preparations for the upcoming D-Day celebrations to mark the 65th anniversary of the June 6, 1944 allied
landings in France, then occupied by Nazi Germany. US President Barack Obama is to lead commemorations
attended by thousands of Americans on June 6 at the ceremony above Omaha Beach, where more than 9,000 US
troops fought and died in June 1944. (JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
 

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A US veteran wears his medals during a commemoration ceremony on June 5, 2009 at the German Military
Cemetery of La Cambe, Normandy. Preparations are underway for the upcoming D-Day celebrations to mark the
65th anniversary of the June 6, 1944 allied landings in France, then occupied by Nazi Germany. US President
Barack Obama is to lead commemorations attended by thousands of Americans on June 6 at the ceremony
above Omaha Beach, where more than 9,000 US troops fought and died in June 1944. (JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
 

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The German artillery battery situated at Longues-sur-Mer is a classic example of the Atlantic Wall fortification.
The actual guns are still in place, west of Arromanches, installed by the Germans in September, 1943. The Batterie
is in an ideal position, 215 feet above sea level and was well able to threaten the Invasion fleet. From late 1943
onwards, the site was bombed several times including two heavy raids in the week before D-Day when 1500 tons of
bombs were dropped on it. (SIPA)
 

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A child plays with a map of the landing beaches in the American Cemetery of Colleville, western France,
Thursday, June 4, 2009. U.S. President Barack Obama will attend the 65th Anniversary of the D-day on June 6th
in Normandy. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
 

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A US veteran takes pictures of German soldiers tombs during a commemoration ceremony on June 5, 2009 at
the German Military Cemetery of La Cambe, Normandy. Preparations are underway for the upcoming D-Day
celebrations to mark the 65th anniversary of the June 6, 1944 allied landings in France, then occupied by
Nazi Germany. US President Barack Obama is to lead commemorations attended by thousands of Americans on
June 6 at the ceremony above Omaha Beach, where more than 9,000 US troops fought and died in June 1944. (JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
 

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A remembrance cross left by British Royal Navy veteran, Harry Buckley, 84, is pictured on the beach of Colleville-
Montgomery on June 5, 2009 where he landed during the 1944 allied operations in France. Preparations are underway
for the upcoming D-Day celebrations to mark the 65th anniversary of the June 6, 1944 allied landings in France,
then occupied by Nazi Germany. US President Barack Obama is to lead commemorations attended by thousands of
Americans on June 6 at the ceremony above Omaha Beach, where more than 9,000 US troops fought and died in
June 1944. (MYCHELE DANIAU/AFP/Getty Images)
 

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British veteran John Lang, 90, visists the American cemetery on June 5, 2009 in Colleville-sur-Mer. Preparations
are underway for the upcoming D-Day celebrations to mark the 65th anniversary of the June 6, 1944 allied landings
in France, then occupied by Nazi Germany. US President Barack Obama is to lead commemorations attended by
thousands of Americans on June 6 at the ceremony above Omaha Beach, where more than 9,000 US troops fought
and died in June 1944. (MARCEL MOCHET/AFP/Getty Images)
 

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The broad sands of Utah Beach lead to a country side scarred by remains of German fortification. On June 6th,
1944, five Normandy beaches were stormed by British, Canadian and American troops to free Europe from the
German occupation. Ever since, each year on June 6th, Normandy coast lures veterans and pilgrims. (Ph: Alexandra BOULAT)
 

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A bird is seen at the American cemetery in Colleville-sur-Mer, Normandy, western France, on June 4, 2009
as take place the preparations of the ceremonies commemorating the 65th anniversary of the D-Day Allied
landings on the beaches of Normandy. US President Barack Obama will meet his French counterpart Nicolas Sarkozy
and attend a ceremony at a cliff-top US war cemetery. British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, Prince Charles and
Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper will also attend the solemn commemoration at Colleville-sur-Mer,
which overlooks the US landing zone dubbed, Omaha Beach. (JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
 

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The remains of the World War II Mulberry dock at Arromanches in Normandy. The Mulberry dock consisted
of a huge pre-fabricated steel and concrete landing system, built in England and towed by ship across the
Channel, greatly aiding the allied landings at Arromanches in 1944. (SIPA)
 

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D-Day veteran George Taylor (left), 86, a Sapper in the Royal Engineers during World War Two, with Percy
Lewis of the 1st Buckinghamshire Battalion, walk along the beach in Arromanches, France, ahead of the 65th
anniversary of the D-Day landings on Saturday. Picture date: Thursday June 4, 2009. Thousands of Second World
War veterans landed in Normandy today in a peaceful invasion of the beaches where they fought for the greatest
victory in naval history on D-Day 65 years ago. (Gareth Fuller/PA) 

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Eric Toylon (right), a 6th Airbourne glider pilot during World War Two shares his memories with war enthusiasts
during a wreath laying ceremony at the Bayeux Military Cemetery in Normandy, France, ahead of tomorrow’s 65th
anniversary of the D-Day landings. (Gareth Fuller/PA)
 

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British paratroopers from the 3rd Parachute Battailon, England, land in a wheat field outside the village of Ranville,
near Caen, Western France, Friday, June 5, 2009, as troops re-enact part of the bloody allied landings of D-Day,
the Allied armada which fought its way inland in the unfolding World War II Battle of Normandy, France.
President Barack Obama and French President Nicolas Sarkozy will attend with other leaders the 65th
Anniversary of the D-day landings on June 6 in Normandy. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
 

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British Royal Navy veteran, Harry Buckley, 84, wipes his tears on the beach of Colleville-Montgomery on
June 5, 2009 where he landed during the 1944 allied operations in France. Preparations are underway for the
upcoming D-Day celebrations to mark the 65th anniversary of the June 6, 1944 allied landings in France, then
occupied by Nazi Germany. US President Barack Obama is to lead commemorations attended by thousands of
Americans on June 6 at the ceremony above Omaha Beach, where more than 9,000 US troops fought
and died in June 1944. (MYCHELE DANIAU/AFP/Getty Images)