Christmas 2016 At The Huntington Library & Gardens

Visiting with Brian and Jan

Off To The See The Wonders Of Mother Nature 12/2/2016

Brian and Jan came to our house and we departed for the Huntington. It is about a 45 minute drive. Greg was supposed to go but alas his back/shoulder was giving him fits.

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea

As we walked into the gardens and the first "display" we saw was called the "Orbit Pavilion"... What is that?

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Each of the satellites were identified on their poster

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
It looked interesting from a distance

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
It was put in place just prior to Halloween 2016

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
It gets it's skin on and forms up rapidly

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Good size inside... It can hold 30-40 people!

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
One way in---One way out

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
The skin is polished and quite modern... It certainly got Brian's attention!

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Speakers, wires, music, looking to the sky... What is it?

Did You Know? - Based on the concept of listening to the sounds of the ocean inside a shell, STUDIOKCA, commissioned by NASA, has created the NASA Orbit Pavilion to immerse visitors in the sounds of satellites orbiting in outer space.

The traveling, nautilus-shaped pavilion provides a space in which to experience the trajectories of 19 satellites orbiting Earth. Made with 3,500 square feet of water-jet cut aluminum panels, the pavilion is "scribed with over 100 'orbital paths' fitted together and bolted to a curved framework of aluminum tubes."

Satellites that study the Earth are passing through space continuously, collecting data on everything from hurricanes to the effects of drought. What if you could make contact with these orbiting spacecraft, and bring them "down to Earth?"

The outdoor installation is the brainchild of Dan Goods and David Delgado, visual strategists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory who worked in collaboration with composer Shane Myrbeck and architect Jason Klimoski of StudioKCA to produce an innovative "soundscape" experience representing the movement of the International Space Station and 19 Earth Science satellites." Inside the large, shell-shaped sculpture, distinctive sounds are emitted as each satellite passes overhead: a human voice, the crashing of a wave, a tree branch moving, a frog croaking. Each sound interprets one of the satellites' missions.

The exhibition inaugurates a new initiative at The Huntington focused on creative collaborations with other organizations. The new project, called "Five," pairs The Huntington with five different organizations over five years, bringing in a range of contemporary artists who will respond to themes drawn from some aspect of the collections. The Library's aerospace history holdings made this first collaboration with NASA/JPL a perfect way to launch the new initiative.

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Each satellite has its own unique sound

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
The speakers hit you at all angles... REAL surround sound!

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Brian enjoyed this experience... He looks so serious!

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
All weather speakers

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea

We decided the cactus gardens would be pretty after the recent rains and we wanted to see the barrel cactus and their fat little tummies stuffed with water!

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Many of the cacti had blooms partially because of the warm weather

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Simply amazing how these little guys can grow up out of the rocks!

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Reach for the sky!

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
OUCH.... Do not lean against this fellow!
He has a pointy personality

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
We decided NOT to invest in Brian's new idea
on how to use cactus leaves

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
We need this sign on our frig! Keep Paul out of the grapes!

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
The sun's angle lit up these cacti and gave them a golden tinge

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Oops! Wazz missing...

Did You Know? - We got the story.  A Yucca was planted here in 1924 and he finally gave up the ghost and fell over. They dug him out and are awaiting an appropriate set of cacti to take his place.

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
The famous "Water Pipe Cactus"... Looks just like a metal pipe, tight?

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Dead? Not, it's just wintertime in the garden

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Fat as can be!

Did You Know? - Some species of Barrel cactus easily reach over 1 metre (3.3 ft) in height at maturity, and have been known to reach 3 metres (9.8 ft) in some regions. The ribs are numerous and pronounced, and the spines are long and can range in color from yellow to tan to red, depending on the age of the plant and the species. Flowers appear at the top of the plant only after many years.

Barrel cactus buds typically start to bloom in April with a bright yellow or orange flower. Pink and red varieties also exist but occur less frequently. The flowers only appear on the very top of the plant. As the flowers begin to wilt in early May, they may change color. A late summer desert rainstorm can produce a late bloomer as shown in the photo of the orange flowered variety (it bloomed two days after a rain storm in mid August and then continued to bloom right through the end of September).

One should approach a barrel cactus with extreme caution. A puncture to human skin from one of the spines is considered a dirty wound. If the puncture is deep enough to draw blood, antibiotics may be needed; and could take up to several months for the wound to heal properly. Barrel cactus plants are one of the more dangerous cacti to humans in the desert.

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Brian studies the great African water tree...

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Jan keeps thinking about the big hill ahead of us!

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
"What would Hans think of this????"

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Indeed a Sausage Tree....

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Brian and Paul's imaginations were working overtime!

"Off to one side sits a group of shepherds. They sit silently on the floor, perhaps perplexed, perhaps in awe, no doubt in amazement. Their night watch had been interrupted by an explosion of light from heaven and a symphony of angels. God goes to those who have time to hear him"-- and so on this cloudless night he went to simple shepherds." -- Max Lucado

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
We made it to the rose garden and it was lovely!

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
"Spot of tea?"

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
"Too many selections! What should I try?"

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Tea comes after the champagne

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
"Me... I mix to two!"

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Holy Mackerel.... Da food dun arrived and there is plenty!

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Brian uses the "magic decoder ring" to figure out what is what!

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
The finger sandwiches disappear

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
"I love these little sugar cubes"

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea

Did You Know? - English crumpets are generally circular, roughly 8 cm (3") in diameter and 2 cm (0.8") thick. Their shape comes from being restrained in the pan/griddle by a shallow ring. They have a characteristic flat top with many small pores and a chewy and spongy texture.

They may be cooked until ready to eat warm from the pan but are frequently left slightly under cooked so that they may be cooled and stored before being eaten freshly toasted. They are often eaten with a spread of butter or an alternative, such as jam, honey, chocolate spread, margarine or yeast extract.

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
"Oh stop it... Don't be Koi"

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
"Let's get moving... The sun is dropping and so is the temperature!"

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
The gold is coming on the ginko trees

Did You Know? - Ginkgo biloba, known as ginkgo or gingko (both pronounced /ˈɡɪŋkoʊ/), also known as the ginkgo tree or the maidenhair tree, is the only living species in the division Ginkgophyta, all others being extinct. It is found in fossils dating back 270 million years. Native to China, the tree is widely cultivated and was introduced early to human history. It has various uses in traditional medicine and as a source of food.

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
The leaves cover the ground and soon will completely
cover the grass with a carpet of gold

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
"Good time of year NOT to be a gardener

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
A beautiful display of fall colors

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
An amazing tree but requires a lot of work!

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
The water in the stream was cold and moving pretty fast

"Off to one side sits a group of shepherds. They sit silently on the floor, perhaps perplexed, perhaps in awe, no doubt in amazement. Their night watch had been interrupted by an explosion of light from heaven and a symphony of angels. God goes to those who have time to hear him"-- and so on this cloudless night he went to simple shepherds." -- Max Lucado

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
On a cold Winter's day

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Almost like a mirror.... The ducks keep the water moving!

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Floating on the lake

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Love the moon bridges

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Is this one correct or...

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
is this one correct one???

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
What is that on the little island?

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
We renamed the island "Goose Island"

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Just lounging around

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
The guard stands duty

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
There were seven geese on the island

"Off to one side sits a group of shepherds. They sit silently on the floor, perhaps perplexed, perhaps in awe, no doubt in amazement. Their night watch had been interrupted by an explosion of light from heaven and a symphony of angels. God goes to those who have time to hear him"-- and so on this cloudless night he went to simple shepherds." -- Max Lucado

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Decisions decisions

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Brian tries sake!

Did You Know? - Sake also spelled saké in English, is a Japanese rice wine made by fermenting rice that has been polished to remove the bran. Unlike wine, in which alcohol (ethanol) is produced by fermenting sugar that is naturally present in grapes, sake is produced by a brewing process more like that of beer, where the starch is converted into sugars before being converted to alcohol.

The brewing process for sake differs from the process for beer in that, for beer, the conversion from starch to sugar and from sugar to alcohol occurs in two discrete steps. Like other rice wines, when sake is brewed, these conversions occur simultaneously. Furthermore, the alcohol content differs between sake, wine, and beer. Wine generally contains 9%–16% ABV, while most beer contains 3%–9%, and undiluted sake contains 18%–20% (although this is often lowered to about 15% by diluting with water prior to bottling).

In the Japanese language, the word "sake" (酒, "liquor", also pronounced shu) can refer to any alcoholic drink, while the beverage called "sake" in English is usually termed nihonshu (日本酒, "Japanese liquor"). Under Japanese liquor laws, sake is labelled with the word seishu (清酒, "clear liquor"), a synonym less commonly used in conversation.

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Jan was the designated driver this evening... A good thing!

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
The Finch's met Sei and Manny.. The sushi chefs

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea
Slicing and chopping and preparing beautiful dishes


Helpful hint for Brian....


"OK... We are going home now.... What has Paul done to Brian again?"

Brian, Jan, Sue, and Paul go to the Huntington Library for high tea