Christmas 2013 Means It's Time For A "Battle Sail"

Christmas, children, is not a date. It is a state of mind. ~Mary Ellen Chase

12/29/2013 The Battle Begins (Page Two)

Page 1 - Arrival, Boarding, And Battle Preparations | Page 2 - The Battle Begins!

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013

Did You Know? - Since ancient times, war at sea had been fought much like on land: with melee weapons and bows and arrows, but on floating wooden platforms rather than battlefields. Though the introduction of guns was a significant change, it only slowly changed the dynamics of ship-to-ship combat.

The first guns on ships were small wrought-iron pieces mounted on the open decks and in the fighting tops, often requiring only one or two men to handle them. They were designed to injure, kill or simply stun, shock and frighten the enemy prior to boarding.

As guns were made more durable to withstand stronger gunpowder charges, they increased their potential to inflict critical damage to the vessel rather than just their crews. Since these guns were much heavier than the earlier anti-personnel weapons, they had to be placed lower in the ships, and fire from gunports, to avoid ships becoming unstable.

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
The dang wind keeps blowing the fire out!

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Is this going to be noisy???

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
The Captain looks perplexed

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
The pirates are sneaking up on us!

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Boom! First blood

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Hans get a picture for the evidence

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Take that you devil!

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013 Great target

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013 Blam

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
It's smoking

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
She was running from us

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013 Broadside!

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
She joined the fight.... Shelled each of us!

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Another gun shot

Did You Know? - First invented in China, cannon were among the earliest forms of gunpowder artillery, and over time replaced siege engines—among other forms of ageing weaponry—on the battlefield. In the Middle East, the first use of the hand cannon is argued to be during the 1260 Battle of Ain Jalut between the Mamluks and Mongols. The first cannon in Europe were probably used in Iberia in the 11th and 12th centuries, and English cannon were first deployed in the Hundred Years' War, at the Battle of Crécy, in 1346.

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Dang... She will not give up!

Did You Know? - Cannon is derived from the Old Italian word cannone, meaning "large tube", which came from Latin canna, in turn originating from the Greek κάννα (kanna), "reed", and then generalized to mean any hollow tube-like object; cognate with Akkadian term qanu and Hebrew qāneh, meaning "tube" or "reed".

The word has been used to refer to a gun since 1326 in Italy, and 1418 in England. Cannon serves both as the singular and plural of the noun, although in American English the plural cannons is more common.

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
"Take that you devil!"

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Hans is calling the shots

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
An amazing vessel

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Blam

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
"Hey Paul, I have an Idea!"

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013

Did You Know? - "Sink the Bismark" (later "Sink the Bismarck") is a novelty song, written by country music singer Johnny Horton and Tillman Franks, based on the pursuit and eventual sinking of the German battleship Bismarck in May 1941, during World War II. Horton released this song in 1960, where it reached #3 on the charts.

As originally released the record label used the common misspelling "Bismark", this was corrected for later releases of the song.

It was inspired by the 1960 movie Sink the Bismarck! and was in fact (with the English producer John Brabourne's approval) commissioned from Johnny Horton by 20th Century Fox who were worried about the subject's relative obscurity. While the song was used in U.S. theater trailers for the film, it was not used in the film itself.

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
"I likes the boom boom!"

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
"I know what kind of a cannon we need!"

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
A new kind of ear protection!
Pour wine in the ears and they go to sleep

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
The sun be setting

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
"OK... We will get him this time!"

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
"I saw it... It was a direct hit"

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Donna knows the strategy....
Get them in the cross-hairs and blast-em

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Everyone is on their tippy-toes listening to Donna explain what happened

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
"I'll drink to that!"

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Bob get the first hand scoop from the crew!"

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
"Do you like my new hair cut?"

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
"Remember... I am watching you!"

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
"You want to work???"

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
"All you have to do is pull!"

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Pull... Yank... Pull... Yank...

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Well done!

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Clap clap clap

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
See the green flag... It is the captains wind indicator

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Taking in the sails

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Hans is flashing again

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
The camera was busy

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Oh oh... Here comes a big one... Shall we fire on it???

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Angels Gate with assistance from the sun!

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
We are coming home

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
The Princess blocks the sun just for us....

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
All smiles....

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
No green flash tonight

Did You Know? - Green flashes and green rays are optical phenomena that occur shortly after sunset or before sunrise, when a green spot is visible, usually for no more than a second or two, above the sun, or it may resemble a green ray shooting up from the sunset point. Green flashes are a group of phenomena stemming from different causes, and some are more common than others.

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
I give up!

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
"The Green Flash?"

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
All wrapped up as the temperature was dropping dramatically

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
"This was fun!"

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
The sails have to be put asleep in their little beds

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Comming into port

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Oh oh... Another cruise liner going out to celebrate the New Year

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
The Captain says "All A-OK"

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
"I didn't know they had a galley on board!"

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Surprise! We sang Happy Birthday!

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Not only did Hans blow out the candle, he devoured the "cake"

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013
Warming up before setting sail for home

Sailing on San Pedro Bay December 2013

Sound: The Theme From Victory At Sea

Victory at Sea is a documentary television series about warfare in general during World War II, and naval warfare in particular, as well as the use of industry in warfare. It was originally broadcast by NBC in the USA in 1952–1953. It was condensed into a film in 1954.

Excerpts from the music soundtrack, by Richard Rodgers and Robert Russell Bennett, were re-recorded and sold as record albums. The original TV broadcasts comprised 26 half-hour segments—Sunday afternoons at 3pm (EST) in most markets—starting October 26, 1952 and ending May 3, 1953. The series, which won an Emmy award in 1954 as "best public affairs program", played an important part in establishing historic "compilation" documentaries as a viable television genre.

Page 1 - Arrival, Boarding, And Battle Preparations | Page 2 - The Battle Begins!