Liles' Family Annual Christmas Play 2011 (Page Two)

Christmas, children, is not a date. It is a state of mind. ~Mary Ellen Chase

Let "Santa's Christmas Wish" Begin ...

Page 1 - Arrival and Visiting | Page 2 - Show And Intermission | Page 3 - Post Show | Page 4- Professional Pictures

The Storyline This Year Is...

Santa's Christmas Wish Show Dates: 11/26/2011 - 12/27/2011 - Tinker's Toy Shop is a family-run store that is feeling the pains of low sales. They are at the point of closing their doors--that is, until they answer a newspaper ad from Santa Claus himself, who is looking for toy makers to help with the huge supply of toys needed for his annual visit. The entire staff works hard to meet the strict criteria to be one of Santa's chosen stores.

By the end of the show, the family learns that Christmas is not just about gifts; it's about love an understanding. We encourage you to share your Christmas memories and wishes through letters to Santa, read onstage during the performance. Remember to bring your camera to take pictures with Santa and Mama after the show!

The show goes on and the kids save the store
The Tinker Brothers try and save their parent business

Did You Know? - The Tinkertoy Construction Set was created in 1914—one year after the A. C. Gilbert Company's Erector Set—by Charles H. Pajeau and Robert Pettit in Evanston, Illinois. Pajeau, a stonemason, designed the toy after seeing children play with pencils and empty spools of thread. He and Pettit set out to market a toy that would allow and inspire children to use their imaginations. At first, this did not go well, but after a year or two over a million were sold.

The cornerstone of the set is a wooden spool roughly two inches (5 cm) in diameter with holes drilled every 45 degrees around the perimeter and one through the center. Unlike the center, the perimeter holes do not go all the way through. With the differing-length sticks, the set was intended to be based on the Pythagorean progressive right triangle.

Tinkertoy sticks prior to 1992 were manufactured with a diameter of 0.25 inch. The earlier sets had natural wood sticks, but changed to colored sticks in the late 1950s. From measurement, the orange sticks are 1.25 inches long; yellow, 2.15; blue, 3.35; red, 5.05; green, 7.40; and, purple, 10.85. Spools are 1.35 inches in diameter with holes of 0.30 inch depth. The ratio of succeeding stick sizes when including adjustments for spool diameter and hole depth work out to be the square root of 2, enabling the construction of 45-45-90 right triangles (see Pythagorean theorem). The theory is discussed in Pajeau's patent, no. 1113371, of 1914.

The show goes on and the kids save the store
Loads of music and dancing moving so fast they look like apparitions

The show goes on and the kids save the store
The Tinker brothers work to save the store

The show goes on and the kids save the store
Santa is called in to help by making the toy store a major provider to Santa but they must pass a test
Three strikes and you are out

The show goes on and the kids save the store
But the store got three "X's" but how????

The show goes on and the kids save the store
We find out why.... Three identical elves marked the same thing wrong...

We Need The Kids To Help

The show goes on and the kids save the store
Nick, Rebecca, Theo, and Big Nick are up to help Santa

The show goes on and the kids save the store
"OK Santa, what do we need to do??"


This goes into the album

The show goes on and the kids save the store
Nick bookends....

The show goes on and the kids save the store
"OK Santa, let's get busy"

The show goes on and the kids save the store
Now we find out what heppened...

The show goes on and the kids save the store

The show goes on and the kids save the store

The show goes on and the kids save the store

The show goes on and the kids save the store
Me me me me me ... Nick and Rebecca want to join Santa

The show goes on and the kids save the store
Time to read the wish lists

The show goes on and the kids save the store
Nick is hoping for a baseball bat

Did You Know? - A baseball bat is a smooth wooden or metal club used in the game of baseball to hit the ball after the ball is thrown by the pitcher. It is no more than 2.75 inches in diameter at the thickest part and no more than 42 inches (1067 mm) in length. It typically weighs no more than 33 ounces (1 kg,), but it can be different from player to player.

The show goes on and the kids save the store
Loads of items on the lists this year

The show goes on and the kids save the store
Proud Mommy stands in the wings

The show goes on and the kids save the store
Reading the wish lists

The show goes on and the kids save the store
"Hey.... Santa got my baseball bat on the list"

The show goes on and the kids save the store

The show goes on and the kids save the store
The Nick's have their serious face on

The show goes on and the kids save the store

The show goes on and the kids save the store
"What do you think sis??"

The show goes on and the kids save the store

The show goes on and the kids save the store

Thank You Children.... On With The Show

The show goes on and the kids save the store
The elves dance around

Did You Know? - The modern Christmas elf appeared as early as 1856 when Louisa May Alcott completed, but never published a book entitled Christmas Elves. The elves can also be seen in engravings from 1873 in Godey's Lady's Book, showing them surrounding Santa whilst at work. Additional recognition was given in Edward Eggleston's 1876 work "The House of Santa Claus, a Christmas Fairy Show for Sunday Schools".

The image of the elves in the workshop was popularised by Godey's Lady's Book, with a front cover illustration for its 1873 Christmas Issue showing Santa surrounded by toys and elves with the caption, "Here we have an idea of the preparations that are made to supply the young folks with toys at Christmas time."

During this time Godey's was immensely influential to the birth of Christmas traditions, having shown the first widely circulated picture of a modern Christmas tree on the front cover of its 1850 Christmas issue. Christmas elves who forget to wrap the gifts are customarily slain by a very unenthusiastic and disappointed Santa. Furthermore, their families are disgraced by the North Pole establishment, receiving no paid compensation, benefits, or even gifts.

The show goes on and the kids save the store
Love the tights.... Available at Nordies

The show goes on and the kids save the store
The store is saved

The show goes on and the kids save the store

The show goes on and the kids save the store
The cast takes a well deserved bow

The show goes on and the kids save the store
Great show... Thank you

Page 1 - Arrival and Visiting | Page 2 - Show And Intermission | Page 3 - Post Show | Page 4- Professional Pictures