South Coast Repertory Scrooge Christmas 2011

Christmas, children, is not a date. It is a state of mind. ~Mary Ellen Chase

Year #32 Of The Production Of Scrooge 12/10/2011

19th-century London comes to life when your family joins the SCR family to celebrate Hal Landon Jr.’s 31st season as everyone’s favorite curmudgeon (“The quintessential Ebenezer Scrooge!” according to the Daily Pilot). Recapture the spirit of an old-fashioned Christmas with this timeless Dickens classic and all your favorite characters—Tiny Tim and the Cratchit family, the Fezziwigs, the Ghosts of Christmas past, present and yet-to-come—and, of course, Ebenezer Scrooge himself.

Charles Dickens was born in Portsmouth and spent most of his childhood in London and Kent. His first novel, The Pickwick Papers (1836-1837), was published in monthly serial installments and became an instant hit. In 1843, he published A Christmas Carol, one of the most popular Christmas stories of all time. Dickens was a prolific writer, and critics regard his later works as his finest. Some of these include Bleak House (1852-1853), Great Expectations (1860-1861), Oliver Twist (1837-1839), and A Tale of Two Cities (1859). Dickens is buried in Westminster Abbey.

We Began At Seasons 52... A Delightful Place To Dine

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Scallops do NOT get better than this

Did You Know? - A scallop (play /ˈskɒləp/ or /ˈskæləp/) is a marine bivalve mollusk of the family Pectinidae. Scallops are a cosmopolitan family, found in all of the world's oceans. Many scallops are highly prized as a food source. The brightly colored, fan-shaped shells of some scallops, with their radiating fluted pattern, are valued by shell collectors. The name "scallop" is derived from the Old French escalope, which means "shell".

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Scallop shells

The Seasons 52 menu is seasonally-inspired with the fresh appeal of the farmer’s market. It represents a unique blend of art and science, with creative offerings designed to excite and surprise the palate. We feature dining choices that are thoughtfully prepared and in appropriate portion sizes. So our guests feel the freedom to indulge in a complete dining experience, including our custom flatbreads and signature mini-indulgence desserts, while still feeling good about themselves and their dining choices.

We use natural cooking techniques such as wood-fire grilling, brick-oven cooking and caramelizing vegetables to let the natural flavors shine through. And we execute precision with seasoning, and oil with control and care to ensure just the right amount is used to bring out the great flavor profiles. An added benefit to this style is that our menu items are naturally lower in calories. In fact, we make a promise that nothing on our menu is over 475 calories. The result is great tasting, highly satisfying food that just so happens to be good for you!

Seasons 52

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Winter squash trio... Sweet as sugar

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
A vegetarians delight

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Thomas and Hannah joined us for the afternoon

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Hannah is about to chomp down....

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Nick is having fun

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Dessert is presented... Nick wants one of each

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Thomas and Paul selected "Rocky Road" ice cream

Did You Know? - Rocky road ice cream is a chocolate flavor. Though there are variations on the flavor, it is traditionally composed of chocolate ice cream, nuts, and marshmallows. The flavor was created in March 1929 by William Dreyer in Oakland, California when he cut up walnuts and marshmallows with his wife's sewing scissors and added them to his chocolate ice cream in a manner that reflected his partner Joseph Edy's chocolate candy creation incorporating walnuts and marshmallow pieces. Later, the walnuts would be replaced by pieces of toasted almond. After the Wall Street Crash of 1929, the company gave the flavor its current name "to give folks something to smile about in the midst of the Great Depression." Alternatively, Fentons Creamery in Oakland claims that William Dreyer based his recipe on a Rocky Road-style ice cream flavor invented by his friend, Fentons' George Farren, who blended his own Rocky Road-style candy bar into ice cream; however, Dreyer substituted almonds for walnuts.

The original Rocky Road ice cream used chocolate ice cream with no chocolate chip pieces. Today, Rocky Road can be obtained based on vanilla ice cream with chocolate chips, marshmallows and almonds.

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Slurp

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Tummies are full

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Nick is ready to go

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
We are here and ready to go across the street

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Save the film

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Outside Seasons 52...

Ready For The Show

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
"Who? Me?"

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Thomas, Hannah and Sue

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Unkle Paul gets into the picture with his new scarf, a gift from Robin

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Paul and Del with clashing colors

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Who is NOT dressed for Christmas?

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
When the boys all get together

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Time for a drinkie-poo... Champagne and coffee with Bailey's

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends

The Play Was Fantastic...

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
A letter from Scrooge

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
The ghosts appear

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
A toast to Uncle Scrooge

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
At half-time we again visit our favorite bartender for a libation

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
Christmas is a humbug

Did You Know? - Humbug is an old term meaning hoax or jest. While the term was first described in 1751 as student slang, its etymology is unknown. Its present meaning as an exclamation is closer to 'nonsense' or 'gibberish', while as a noun, a humbug refers to a fraud or impostor, implying an element of unjustified publicity and spectacle. The term is also used for certain types of candy.

The word has existed in many countries unconnected with the British Empire, for a long time. For instance, in Germany it has been known since the 1830s, in Sweden since at least 1862, in France since at least 1875, in Hungary, ] and in Finland.

The oldest known written uses of the word are in the book The Student (1750–1751), ii. 41, where it is called "a word very much in vogue with the people of taste and fashion," and in Ferdinando Killigrew's The Universal Jester, subtitled "a choice collection of many conceits ... bon-mots and humbugs" from 1754; as mentioned in Encyclopædia Britannica from 1911, which further refers to the New English Dictionary.

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
The cast takes a bow.... Well deserved

Did You Know? - Bowing (also called stooping) is the act of lowering the torso and head as a social gesture in direction to another person or symbol. It is most prominent in Asian cultures but it is also typical of nobility and aristocracy in many countries and distinctively in Europe. Sometimes the gesture may be limited to lowering the head. It is especially prominent in China, Korea, India, Taiwan, Japan, and Vietnam where it may be executed standing or kneeling.

In European cultures — aside from bows done by performers on stage, such as at the curtain call — bowing is an exclusively male practice, and females instead perform a related gesture called a "curtsey" or "curtsy." The depth of the bow is related to the degree of respect or gratitude. In European courtly circles, males were expected to "bow and scrape" (hence the term "bowing and scraping" for what appears to be excessive ceremony).

"Scraping" refers to the drawing back of the right leg as one bows, such that the right foot scrapes the floor or earth. Typically, while executing such a bow, the man's left hand is pressed horizontally across the abdomen while the right is held out from the body.

Heading For Home

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends
The malls were full of people even at 5:30 pm....

A Christmas Carol at South Coast Repertory with Family and Friends