Club 33 With Ernie And John

Life is fun!

Ernie, John, Robin, Bob, Paul and Sue Visit Club 33

This was a surprise for John who has always wanted to go to Club 33! Please join the fun!

We arrive promptly at 4:00 for a pre-departure cocktail. At 4:30 sharp we head out and aim towards Disneyland.

Did you know? - There are various origins that have been claimed for the name "Club 33." One says that Club 33 was named for Disneyland's 33 sponsors at the time, one of which was Chevron.

Another explanation is that Walt Disney chose the name simply because he liked the way "33" looked. Another, given by a Club 33 employee, says that since Walt wanted to serve liquor in the Club he had to obtain a liquor license—which requires a full street address. Walt, wanting to protect Disneyland's alcohol-free status, didn't want to use the park's Harbor Boulevard address, so he ordered that all the buildings in New Orleans Square (then under construction) be given addresses.

According to the employee, "33" was chosen because Walt's lucky number was 3.

Even though various web sites have shown the liquor license to have Disneyland's main address of 1313 Harbor Boulevard, this rumor persists.

Yet another explanation is that "33" when turned on its side bears similarity to two letter "M"s, which would stand for "Mickey Mouse" in addition to resembling a pair of mouse ears.

It also may be because Disney's only natural born child, Diane Disney Miller, was born in 1933.

Finally, it has been rumored that Walt Disney was a 33rd Degree Scottish Rite Freemason, and the Club name and address is a direct reference to this.

However, according to Disneyland tour guides and Club management, none of these stories are accurate. The official explanation is that 33 is simply the address assigned to the door by chance—all of the buildings in New Orleans Square have addresses, but they are internally designated numbers.

The Limo Ride Was Definitely An "E" Ticket!!!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
We were cleared for takeoff at 4:30 runway 270 Left

Did you know? - A limousine (or limo) is a luxury vehicle sedan or saloon car, especially one with a lengthened wheelbase or driven by a chauffeur. The chassis of a limousine may have been extended by the manufacturer or by an independent coach builder. These are referred to as "stretch" limousines and are traditionally black or white in color. Limousines are often driven by chauffeurs and until the mid-1990s were most often associated with the very rich[citation needed]. They are also used for special occasions such as weddings, parties and sight-seeing tours.

The first automobile limousine, built in 1902, was designed so the driver sat outside under a covered compartment. The word limousine is derived from the name of the French region Limousin, because this covered compartment physically resembled the cloak hood worn by the shepherds there. An alternate etymology has the chauffeur wearing a Limousin-style cloak in the open driver's compartment, for protection from the weather.

The first “stretch limousine” was created in Fort Smith, Arkansas around 1928 by a coach company named Armbruster. These cars were primarily used to transport famous “big band” leaders, such as Glenn Miller and Benny Goodman, and their bands and equipment. These early stretch limousines were often called “big band buses”.

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
John is ready to go.. A bottle of red and white!!  It's a "Blush Kit"

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Vicky (the driver) begins pre-flight checkout while John works on the important things... Opening the wine!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Sue just enjoys the cavorting

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Getting their pre-take off briefing

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
"Do NOT hit this switch!  It is the EJECTION SWITCH!"

Did you know? - In aircraft and stretch limo's, an ejection seat is a system designed to rescue the pilot or other crew of an aircraft/limo (usually military or golfers) in an emergency. In most designs, the seat is propelled out of the aircraft by an explosive charge or rocket motor, carrying the pilot with it. Once clear of the aircraft, the ejection seat deploys a parachute. Ejection seats are common on military aircraft and limo's headed for Disneyland!!

A bungee-assisted escape from an aircraft took place in 1910. In 1916 Everard Calthrop, an early inventor of parachutes, patented an ejector seat using compressed air.

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
OK guys, how about a little kiss to start the evening?

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
OMG! Their not breathing.... Come up for air..... The wine is beginning to boil!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Someone is really enjoying all this!!!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Cell phone pictures to Bunnaford are a necessity

Did you know? - In 1908, U.S. Patent 887,357 for a wireless telephone was issued to Nathan B. Stubblefield of Murray, Kentucky. He applied this patent to "cave radio" telephones and not directly to cellular telephony as the term is currently understood. Cells for mobile phone base stations were invented in 1947 by Bell Labs engineers at AT&T and further developed by Bell Labs during the 1960s.

Martin Cooper, a Motorola researcher and executive is considered to be the inventor of the first practical mobile phone for hand-held use in a non-vehicle setting. Cooper is the first inventor named on "Radio telephone system" filed on October 17, 1973 with the US Patent Office and later issued as US Patent 3,906,166;[8] other named contributors on the patent included Cooper's boss, John F. Mitchell, Motorola's chief of portable communication products, who successfully pushed Motorola to develop wireless communication products that would be small enough to use outside the home, office or automobile and participated in the design of the cellular phone. Using a modern, if somewhat heavy portable handset, Cooper made the first call on a hand-held mobile phone on April 3, 1973 to a rival, Dr. Joel S. Engel of Bell Labs.

We Departed The Vehicle At The Transportation Hub And Met Robin & Bob

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
We enjoyed it so much, we entered the area twice!!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Wheels down, we made it!!!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
It was a beautiful evening... Not too hot nor cold!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
John is singing "We're off to see the wizard... the wonderful wizard of Oz"

Did you know? - The (Off to see the wizard) melody's first appearance begins with the Munchkins reciting and Judy Garland echoing "Follow the Yellow Brick Road!", which turns into a group vocal by the Munchkins (while Garland skips and dances along the road) and then segues into "You're Off to See the Wizard". This is what Munchkins look like form the back!

We're Back!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
5:20 gives us an hour to explore before Club 33

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
What better than a train ride around the

Did you know? - The Disneyland Railroad (DLRR), originally the Santa Fe & Disneyland Railroad, is a narrow gauge railroad at Disneyland, Anaheim, California, United States, that was inaugurated on the park's opening day, July 17, 1955. This live steam railway was constructed for $240,000; each of the original four locomotives cost $40,000. Riders use it as transportation to other areas of the park or simply for the experience of the "Grand Circle Tour". The Main Street railroad station is seen entering Disneyland. Including stops, the train takes twenty minutes to circle the park. As an 1894 product of the Baldwin Locomotive Works, number 3 is the oldest locomotive in service at any Disney property.

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
They are beginning to look hungry!

Did you know? - The common whistles on the DLRR are:

  • One Short - Attention
  • Two Short – Forward Movement
  • Three Short – Reverse Movement
  • One Long, One Short – Approaching Station
  • One Long, Two Short – Crew spotted along track. (Also used as a general greeting)
  • Two Long, One Short, One Long – Public Crossing ahead (with bell)
  • Two Long, One Short – Meeting Point (Junction)
  • One Long – Stop Immediately or Emergency stop.
  • Four Long – Train in distress.

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
It's A Small World was still decorated in it's Christmas attire!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
John and Ernie kept yelling "Go faster.. go faster"

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
The lights became a blur!

Did you know? -The Ride was originally titled "Children of the World". When Walt Disney demonstrated it to songwriters Robert B. Sherman and Richard M. Sherman, the ride's soundtrack featured numerous national anthems all playing at once, which resulted in a musical cacophony. Walt said, "I need one song." In response, the brothers wrote It's a Small World (After All). It is argued that the song is the most performed and most widely translated song on earth.

We Jumped Off At Main Street And Headed For Club 33

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
How did Mickey know we were coming???

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
We are ready, willing and able!

We Arrive In New Orleans Square

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
We have arrived!

Did you know? - To enter Club 33, a guest must press a buzzer on an intercom concealed by a hidden panel in the doorway. (At one time, a member needed only to insert his/her membership card in a slot near the buzzer and the door would open. However, this process no longer works.) A receptionist will ask for their name over the intercom and, if access is granted, open the door to a small, ornate lobby. Guests have the option of going to the dining level via an antique-style glass lift.

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Knock knock knock... Good name for a song!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Oh no!  We have to pass a breathalyzer test!

Did you know? - A 1927 paper produced by Emil Bogen, who collected air in a football and then tested this air for traces of alcohol, discovered that the alcohol content of 2 liters of expired air was a little greater than that of 1 cc of urine. However, research into the possibilities of using breath to test for alcohol in a person's body dates as far back as 1874, when Anstie made the observation that small amounts of alcohol were excreted in breath.

The first practical roadside breath-testing device intended for use by the police was the drunkometer. The drunkometer was developed by Professor Harger in 1938. The drunkometer collected a motorist's breath sample directly into a balloon inside the machine. The breath sample was then pumped through an acidified potassium permanganate solution. If there was alcohol in the breath sample, the solution changed color. The greater the color change, the more alcohol there was present in the breath.

The drunkometer was quite cumbersome and was approximately the size of a shoe box. It was more reminiscent of a portable laboratory.

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
We passed!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
The hard part is now done... Now we go upstairs

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
First floor lift station, ready to elevate guests to the most wonderful dining experience Disneyland has to offer.

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
"Ernie, may I give you a lift???

Did you know? - Guests have the option of going to the dining level via an antique-style glass lift. The lift is an exact replica of one Disney saw and fell in love with during a vacation in Paris, but the owner of the original refused to sell. Undaunted, Disney sent a team of engineers to the Parisian hotel to take exact measurements for use in the creation of a replica; even a sample of the original finish was taken so that it could be duplicated. A staircase to the second level wraps around the lift.

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
We await their arrival

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
"We made it... All is well"

A Short Walk To The Table

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Paul and John had a hard time passing the "Lounge Alley Bar!!"

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
The main dining area was ready to go!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Robin does "The Pose"

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Swoon!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Bob and John seem to have hit it off!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
John self poses for his cell camera.  Bob helps steer the lens

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Admiring his work!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Paul escapes from behind the camera

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
"Quick Ernie, John is still admiring his own picture"

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
We both shield her from the restaurant while she makes her call

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
John gracefully hides the fact that Ernie is on the Great Grand Son Phone!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
What goes on behind the menu

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
M-I-C  K-E-Y  M-O-U-S-E
What big ears you have grandpa!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
"Are these better?????"

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
We voted for John's ears

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Not to be outdone... Ernie has three ears!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Bob shows us the "hat kit components"

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Lamb chops galore!

Did you know? - A meat chop is a cut of meat cut perpendicularly to the spine, and usually containing a rib or riblet part of a vertebra and served as an individual portion. The most common kinds of meat chops are pork and lamb. A thin boneless chop, or one with only the rib bone, may be called a cutlet, though the difference is not always clear. The term "chop" is not usually used for beef, but a T-bone steak is essentially a loin chop, and a rib steak a rib chop.

In Great Britain, the idea of a chop comes from the 17th century, when London chophouses started cooking individual portions of meat.

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
John's camera keeps on ticking

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
The "Grammy Phone" gets pressed into service

Some Light Entertainment On The Glass Harmonica Before Desert Is Provide By John

Did you know? - The glass harmonica, also known as the glass armonica, bowl organ, hydrocrystalophone, or simply the armonica (derived from "harmonia", the Greek word for harmony), is a type of musical instrument that uses a series of glass bowls or goblets graduated in size to produce musical tones by means of friction (instruments of this type are known as friction idiophones).

The Irish musician Richard Puckeridge is typically credited as the first to play an instrument composed of glass vessels by rubbing his fingers around the rims. Beginning in the 1740s, he performed in London on a set of upright goblets filled with varying amounts of water.

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
John's selection of glasses was.... ah, odd??

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
"John, can you play our favorite... Far Far Away?"

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
John was a little nervous when the fire department showed up!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Paul prays that the waiter doesn't s

The "Ta-Da's"

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
John shows us how to do it!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Ernie learns fast!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Robin and Bob do a "Joint Ta-Da"

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Paul give it a try!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Sue shows us how it is really done

Time To Head Out And Return To Reality

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
The famous phone booth used in "The Happiest Millionaire"

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Antique foyer table used in Mary Poppins!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Do we really have to go??

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
The kids wait for memorabilia while we head for the limo

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
John checked out the Trophy Room

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'   Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Ernie and Sue checked out the Ladies facilities

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
We are heading out after a delightful meal at Club 33

We Are Moving Fast As The Fireworks Are About To Begin

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Ernie does the pre-limo entrance maneuver

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Our carriage returns

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
After several drinks all the limos begin to look alike!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Vicky looks totally stober to us!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'
Sue provides adult supervision to John, Ernie and Paul

Safe And Sound

Tuaca
Our second desert
of the evening!

We joined Ernie and John for a nightcap.. A Little Tuaca and a lot of laughs!

Tuaca is a brand of liqueur produced by the Tuoni and Canepa families of Livorno, Italy. The liqueur is sweet and golden brown in color. Its ingredients include brandy, essence of orange, and vanilla. Vanilla is the dominant flavor. It is bottled at 70 proof (35% ABV) which means we were running at about 80 proof at the end of the evening. The recipe supposedly dates back to the Renaissance. A legend claims that it was created for Lorenzo (Italian for John) the Magnificent.

We all ended up in Ernie's kitchen talking about theater and plays and generally giggling until it was time to turn into pumpkins!

Club 33 with Ernie, John, the Duda's and the Liles'